LA Moms at the 3rd Annual SlutWalk

Photo: German Vizcarra

Photo: German Vizcarra

Speaking out against slut-shaming

Monica Garcia didn't think twice about taking her 2-year old twin daughters to Downtown Los Angeles on the first Sunday in October. She packed snacks for the girls and stayed attentive to them while carrying a sign that read: "Puta Pero No Tu Puta," spanish for "Slut but not your slut."

Garcia was one of several moms interviewed by Mommy In Los Angeles® Magazine during Amber Rose's 3rd Annual Slutwalk, a march intended to encourage people to strut their stuff in honor of women's empowerment.

She marched pushing her daughters' strollers alongside thousands of other men and women, many of whom dressed as provocatively as possible, generally with see-through fishnet stockings, thongs and pasties to cover their topless chests.

For Garcia, having her twins there meant giving the young girls an opportunity to grow up in an "open minded environment".

"People think that we get raped because of the way we dress," she said. "But no, it happens to all ages."

Walking ahead of Garcia, Peggy Wurtz had her own reason for attending the SlutWalk.

"I don't think enough attention is given to women's rights, especially in regards to sexual abuse," said Wurtz. "Date rape is real. I don't think there's enough discussion about how to protect yourself and not get into situations that allow you to be so vulnerable."

Abigail Gil and Shantrece Williams join the crowds at the 3rd Annual Amber Rose SlutWalk with their 2-year old daughter.

Abigail Gil and Shantrece Williams join the crowds at the 3rd Annual Amber Rose SlutWalk with their 2-year old daughter.

And Abigail Gil along with her partner Shantrece Williams were proud to bring their 2-year old daughter along for the march.

"This is more so that our daughter has an open mind when she gets older. It's good for her. It helps so that she's more involved in the LGBT Community," said Gil. "Moms with daugthers need to know that their daughters will one day be called 'sluts' or 'whores'. This is to help them know it's not ok," added Williams.

 

The Rise of the SlutWalk

For people unfamiliar with Amber Rose, the thought of a women's empowerment march labeled a "SlutWalk" may seem to border on the side of inappropriate.

Rose, an activist, entrepreneur, and social media sensation once worked as an erotic dancer. She launched to fame through her high profile relationship with Rapper Kanye West. She later married rapper Wiz Khalifa and had a child with him. Through the rise and ending of her relationships, Rose has maintained a large fan following of her own. When her exes had choice words for Rose, she began to aggressively speak out against derogatory comments aimed at women that are usually sexual in nature (known as 'slut-shaming').

Rose attributes a 2011 incident in Toronto when a police officer told a crowd of college women that if they wanted to avoid sexual assault, they shouldn't dress like sluts– to one of her main reasons for creating the SlutWalk.

What Rose probably didn't realize however, was the fact that many organizations had been looking for ways to promote awareness and in depth discussions about topics such as sexual violence. Her SlutWalk immediately began creating such opportunities. The University of Southern California's Center for Feminist Research, for example, teamed up with Rose and hosted a pre-SlutWalk conference with workshops and discussions focusing on women's rights, sex talk & relationships, digital activism and policy reform.

"I have so much pride in my daughter," said Amber Rose's mother, Dorothy Rose, to Mommy In Los Angeles® Magazine. "This is the third year and it's been big. I'm just so proud of her accomplishments and the love she has for women."

Amber Rose's Mom, Dorothy, stands at the front of the 3rd Annual SlutWalk in support of her daughter's movement on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017.

Amber Rose's Mom, Dorothy, stands at the front of the 3rd Annual SlutWalk in support of her daughter's movement on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017.

A poised and eloquent Rose donned a blonde wig and pink sequined cape with the words: "Captain Save A Hoe". She also took the time to speak to most media outlets in attendance.

"Hatred and judgement demolishes self-esteem; but love and acceptance rebuilds it. When people tear one another down for their choices on how to live their life or govern their body, it divides families and nations," she said.

As far as her message to Los Angeles moms who didn't attend this year's SlutWalk: "I am a mother and it's very important for moms to be here. Mothers are very sexual beings too and a lot of people judge us for that."

The 3rd Annual Amber Rose SlutWalk was followed by a festival intended to play a monumental role in the movement towards gender equality. Attendees had access to free medical services like STD testing as well as ongoing mental health assistance from Los Angeles Family Therapy.

"And it's only gonna get better," Rose said.


Mommy In Los Angeles® Magazine attended the Amber Rose SlutWalk with the objective of learning more about this movement that attracted nearly 20,000 people to Pershing Square on October 1. We support any mother who stands against inequality and has the courage to speak out in favor of personal freedom. Although this event may be viewed by some as a platform for inadequate behavior, we witnessed an unequivocal amount of camaraderie and pride among attendees who felt compelled to support Rose's message. We encourage local moms to join the conversation and look into ways of supporting organizations that help victims of oppression, humiliation and sexual violence.

 

Images from the 3rd Annual Amber Rose Slutwalk

IMG_9703.JPG
Anabel Marquez