Museum of Failure Fails to Close

 Photo: Ashley Tom

Photo: Ashley Tom

The house of the hopeless and hilarious announces new Hollywood location

The shrine to history’s epic fails and corporate flops arrived in Los Angeles and is here to stay. The Museum of Failure announced plans of its limited engagement in Hollywood, opening on March 8.

Due to its lack of failure and wildly popular Downtown Los Angeles exhibition that debuted in December 2017, the museum is continuing to share tales of let-downs and megaflops in a new Hollywood & Highland location.

“I couldn’t imagine a better home for the museum than Hollywood,” says Museum of Failure creator, psychologist, and innovation researcher, Dr. Samuel West. “In Hollywood, there is a fine line between failure and success. The epicenter of entertainment and stardom does not come without its hardships and setbacks — here, failure has produced some of our beloved celebrities. We are thrilled to be part of the Hollywood culture… who knows? If we don’t fail here, maybe we’ll get our own star!”

Not your conventional Instagram pop-up, although there are plenty of snap-worthy moments for everyone ages nine to 90, the Museum of Failure encourages its visitors to come away from the experience having the courage to take on their ambitions, unafraid to fail.

Patrons can look forward to classic catastrophes like the marketing disappointment that was Coca-Cola BlāK, or the over-hyped 1957 Ford Edsel, along with artifacts spanning from the 17th century right up to the present day, including the frozen beef lasagna by toothpaste maker Colgate. Other featured failures new to the Hollywood site are the Juicero, Facebook Gifts, RCA SelectaVision, Pets.com, and Google Wave. The Museum culminates with a Failure Confessional where visitors can add their own personal stories of failures to the collection.

The Museum of Failure will be on exhibit in Hollywood starting March 8, 2018. Tickets go on sale February 23. For more information on the Museum of Failure and to purchase tickets, visit: www.failuremuseum.com.